Posts Tagged ‘Art’

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Kustom Lane – kustom art sale, hotrods, tikis and more

November 22, 2010

 

Hawthorn art gallery/shop/curio haven Kustom Lane are having an Art sale this weekend.  That seems as good a reason as any to profile this mighty unique location, which brings together hotrods, tikis, lounge and gorelesque art,  50s horror schlock and more under one roof.  Kustom Lane is a paen to all things kitschtastic, with an emphasis on rockabilly, psychobilly, horror and burlesque motifs.

They display work by local artists centred around these themes, and sell tikis, have gigs and hotrod related exhibitions… and much more.

Why not make this weekend your excuse to get down to Kustom Lane in Hawthorn and find out more?  Oh and they also have an online art store.

Details:

General Email Enquiries: info@kustomlane.com

Online Store Enquiries: orders@kustomlane.com

LOCATION

8 LUTON LANE
HAWTHORN 3122

PHONE: (03) 9818 1307

Gallery is located near corner of Glenferrie Rd and Burwood Rd.

We are located directly behind The Glenferrie Hotel.

TRANSPORT AND PARKING

Plenty of parking near gallery on weekends.

Use Tram No. 16 or Train to Glenferrie Station.

Glenferrie Station.

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Polyester Books – 330 Brunswick St, Fitzroy

December 30, 2008

Polyester Books – “the world’s freakiest bookstore”.  

Aaah the memories of being a wee lass and seeing my first mind-boggling dose of counter culture for the first time:  realising that not only were subjects like street art, tattooing, fetishism, the occult and alternative music things that other people were interested in, but they were taken SERIOUSLY!  And people wrote BOOKS about them!  The jolly all round squee-ness of realising that there are communities open to dissenting views and that you can be educated about them… well, let’s just say it warms the cockles of this slightly more grown up and savvy heart.  

Polyester Books is indeed a paradise for the profane, a haven for the heretical, a counter cultural cornucopia.  As their website shows, the topics you can browse through at Polyester include:  Globalisation, Freaks and Tattoos, Mind Expansion, Satanic/Witchcraft/Magick, Pop culture, True Crime and ‘Weird Shit’.  Of course, this also means you can purchase from their website too, but a visit is definitely worth your while, what  with their charismatic staff, often great music selection and the ability to leaf through some of these titles to read and see with your own eyes what in fact they’re about before shelling out your hard earned or pressuring your open minded friends for a book on the UFOs that Ate Elvis. 

The best thing about Polyester Books – they’re totally dedicated to supporting counterculture: so much so that they’ve worn 2 brushes with the law and seizures of property because the books they import are sometimes considered rather.naughty.indeed.  And that from Norwegian Black Metal to Zombie Skinheads:  they’ve really got books on absolutely everything kinda kooky at Polyester.  Including some great local and import Zines. 

The worst thing about Polyester Books:  they should be open later – I guess there’s always the interwebs, but if this were Greenwich Village they’d be open until 4am: sometimes you don’t really want to read about satanic bondage in the whitehouse until after 1am, y’know.  seriously. 

Details in their sig above. Opening hours: Monday-Thursday 10am-8pm, Friday and Saturday 10am-9pm and Sunday 11am-8pm.  

Subscribe to their mailing list through the website.

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Stocks of Blocks: A 21st Century Lego Exhibition! Sunday 27th January 08

January 19, 2008

  Whether you’re looking for a soothing kind of childhood regression or extremely interested in the artistic potential contained in the humble rectangle: there are a myriad of reasons why you might wish to revist the kid-magnet that is Lego.  It seems some people never left Lego-land, and have taken the phenomenon quite beyond the humble house, car or even aeroplane structure. So proud are they of their bond with blocks, they’ve created an exhibition of Lego innovation. 


On Sunday 27th January (Australia Day Long Weekend), and located on the 12th Floor of the Victoria University 
Building in Flinders Street, Melbourne CBD, this event will showcase award winning Lego designs and creations by enthusiasts from all over Australia! 
 
In conjunction with the display, you can try your hand at Lego gaming with Brikwars or race one of the Lego
 remote control cars. There’s even a play area for children – although it could be argued that the entire thing is a play area for big children… 
 
Entry is $5 for adults and $2.50 for kids with discounts for family groups. Doors open at 11am. 
Parking is available next door for $8.50 for the whole day.

Further details can be found at: http://www.brickventures.com/
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Catch Replay Marclay at ACMI before the last repeat – February 3rd

January 19, 2008

 

 Replay Marclay is an exhibition currently showing at ACMI @ Federation Square until Feb 3.  It’s a freebie exhibition showing in the basement and showcases the video/sound art of installation art maestro Christian Marclay.  The exhibition was first conceived in France and is doing the rounds in ACMI until February 3rd. As you walk down the stairs you hear the first exhibition, and at the bottom of the stairs you’ll be handed an exhibition pamphlet by an ACMI employee who must either seriously enjoy experimental sound, be well paid or take it in turns, as there seems to be someone down there to greet you throughout the exhibition. The exhibition is in no particular order important to appreciation but if you’re soothed by chronology there seems to be at least a vague nod to this, with his earliest work close to the stairs.  His work is  experimental and conceptual:  you won’t be looking at some MTV video wall – Marclay works with sound as collage – filming people using instruments and records to make sound – but not using them to make music in any conventional way. He also cuts existing film of sounds – some in quite famous films you’ll recognise – to make experimental arrangements.  Sounds intriguing?  Saying any more will definitely spoil the experience a little so to know more escape January’s extreme temperatures (whether it be scorching heat or unexpected rain) and duck into ACMI to take a look fo r yourself. 

The first couple of pieces are interesting insofar as you can see his developing skill and interest in the subject matter of noise bricolage, reassembling sound and vision or focussing on sounds which are not in themselves usually described as ‘musical’ as music.  These themes develop throughout the rest of the exhibition, with several small rooms housing visual and sound pieces of a few minutes each.  

 What is good about Replay Marclay: My personal highlights are ‘guitar drag’ and ‘crossfire’, but telling you too much would possibly change your expectations so I’ll keep this vague but strongly encourage you to see this exhibition even if just for these two spectacular pieces.  Also, it’s free. 

The downside: the early work is a little dodgy in many ways , although it does show his development it has little resonance in comparison to later work.  You might, however, get some ‘daft art for arts sake New York improvisation’ effect from these early pieces. No matter: it probably was daft art for art’s sake but it certainly lead Christian Marclay in more interesting directions later so – art on, Mc Duff!

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Sticky! Melbourne’s Zines haven

January 10, 2008

There’s nowhere in Melbourne like Sticky!  You’ll find this den of Zine-soaked creativity hidden in the Flinders Street Underpass known as the Campbell Arcade (along with a number of other alt.cult.artisan.shopping essential stops – to be detailed another time), which you access either by getting off the train and using the centre stairs or from Flinders Street near Degraves Lane OR from Degraves Lane where the Baguette and Waffle stand is.

It’s a tiny shop next to the-barber-time-forgot (he insists that the magazines in his window are new… come on, now, really), crammed with badges, zines, some cds and odd paraphernalia, all small-run and many local.  Sticky is a fantastic supporter of local visual expression and run on a very humble budget with lots of volunteer assistance - here’s their manifesto, straight from their website.  Do take a look, as they’re running their FESTIVAL OF THE PHOTOCOPIER in February 08- a most intriguing paen to the art work of the humble office machine.

ABOUT STICKY INSTITUTE

Sticky Institute is an Incorporated Association and is a volunteer run, not for profit Artist Run Initiative housed in Degraves Street Subway under Flinders Street, Melbourne. Sticky was originally conceived as a not for profit retail ‘side project’ in 2001 within Platform Artist Group who operate artist exhibition spaces in the subway and nearby lanes.

The three day a week shop-front idea, ‘Sticky’ began with ten artist publications for sale in the Platform office in April 2001. Since then, Sticky has stocked thousands of titles from around Australia and overseas, and has established itself as a nationally and internationally recognised specialty zine and artist book shop.

In 2007 Sticky became an Artist Run Intitiative in its own right, as Sticky Institute Inc. Sticky continues to share Platform’s office space, its shop front, but is separately administered by Coordinators Luke Sinclair (Sticky’s founder and former Platform Coordinator) and Eloise Peace. The shop is manned by Luke, Eloise and its dedicated team of volunteers.

The principal purposes for which the Association is established are:

To strengthen, serve, represent and appropriately promote innovative creative expression that explores and challenges popular perceptions through Melbourne’s zine culture which encompasses visual arts, crafts, literature and design;

To encourage and facilitate self-identity, self-expression and creation of communities through the provision of space and personalised access to practical and artistic resources as part of a broader independent ‘Do It Yourself’ ethic which celebrates self-empowerment and cultural diversity;

To operate a dynamic, accessible not for profit retail outlet with public exposure in a retail environment with a simple submission process that enables anyone to stock their work and become involved in Melbourne’s zine culture, and ensuring that we charge a minimal sales commission (20%) in the retail operation, the emphasis being on returning as much of the retail price as possible back to those involved in the product’s creation.

Sticky values the vital role and contribution of volunteers to the organisation both past and present.

 **************************************

Sticky encourage you to get involved, so get onto their website or pay them a visit and make/talk/buy/read/think!!!

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Metropolis Books and Music – Swanston Street, Melbourne

January 5, 2008


Metropolis Books and Music (website here) is tucked away in Curtin House on Swanston Street in the city.  It’s just a couple of doors up from record store Collectors Corner, and is above beloved watering hole Cookie by a couple of floors.  Curtin House is becoming quite the culture-consumption nexus, what with food and drink (Cookie), burlesque and performance (The Toff in Town) and clothing, jewellery, books and music on level 3, including Metropolis. 
 
Some people might remember the days when Metropolis was in St Kilda, and for those who do the city store will need little introduction as the basic ideas behind the curation of materials on offer are the same.  For those who don’t:  Metropolis is divided into two parts: part one is a bookshop centred broadly around The Arts:  film, graphic design, music, photography, visual art, music and cult crafts.   From small colourful gifty-books about pretty nonsense  (most book shops have these, but Metropolis’ selection are prettier, odder and often locally produced) to impressive hardbacks on architecture, film directors eg Tim Burton, David Lynch, typography, photography and much more.   If you’re after a present or are a little light on the pocket, they also stock fantastic cards and postcards – eg ‘hard boiled’ crime covers on postcards, local artists work, indian kitsch and many more.  
 
In the other part of the store is Metropolis music, sourcing some truly obscure sounds.  A large experimental section includes an admirably large amount of vinyl LPs, featuring much Sun O))), industrial artists, breakcore, some field recordings and more.  New York No Wave rereleases, ambient, psychedelia and indie classics are also on offer – again many on cd – plus the occasional tshirt or other paraphernalia.  
 
Both sections sell gig tickets for numerous events, many at The Toff In Town one floor below.
 
The best thing about Metropolis:  many, many pretty things.  I particularly like the cult film section, but am impressed by the solid selection in visual art, photography, textiles… also the experimental music section which, since the closure of synaesthesia records, may be the most contemporary experimental available over the counter (new, particularly).
 
The downside: can there be a down side to great books and music?  It would be fantastic if it were open the same hours as Cookie and Toff – late night book and music browsing would be ideal.  
 
Details:
 
Metropolis Bookshop
Level 3 Curtin House
252 Swanston Street
Melbourne 3000
Australia

ph: 03 9663 2015
fax: 03 9639 0024

books@metropolisbookshop.com.au
music@metropolisbookshop.com.au

Opening hours:
Mon – Thurs: 10 – 6
Fri: 10 – 7
Sat: 10 – 6
Sun: 12 – 5
 
 
 
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