Posts Tagged ‘artisans’

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Renaissance Bookbinding – St Georges Rd, Fitzroy

January 4, 2010

On my forays from old haunt Preston to the city and back, I passed Renaissance Bookbinders on a daily basis.  The handbound books in the window and intriguing contraptions within held my curious eye on each occasion until, finally, I fashioned an occasion to step inside and enquire about what on earth this cabinet of paper curiousities really is.

As it turns out, the description is helpfully literal.  This shop binds books, using traditional and very beautiful binding methods around since the Renaissance.  They promote the art of book binding in addition to making their honest living through binding books for others.   Their paper presses and other by-hand binding contraptions are fascinating to behold.

Their official spiel is as follows:

Renaissance Bookbinding  was Established in 1981 to promote and enhance his ancient craft of bookbinding and the book arts.Specialising in fine bookbinding & conservation in historical and contemporary designs. Artists’ Books bound in Unique State and Limited Editions. Renaissance Bookbinding is located in a Edwardian shopfront located at 493 Brunswick Street Fitzroy Nth. Melbourne Victoria. The shop window has a display to public of some past and current  work commisioned by artists, designers and printmakers.We have in stock quality Leather Bound Journals, Book Boxes and Albums. Renaissance Bookbinding has unique collection of historical Bookbinding Presses from 1880, Alboin Printing Press from 1858, Vandercook proofing press 1961, Marshall and MaCkay Bristol Gold stamping presses from 1900. Large collection of Gold finishing tools, handset type, brass and foundry. Renaissance Booklbinding offers consultancy for both conservation and binding, all enquiries are welcome.

At the very least, a curious peer through the window of this intriguing establishment is essential on your next Brunswick St trawl.

Their details:

RENAISSANCE BOOKBINDING

493 Brunswick Street, Fitzroy North, VIC 3068

p: (03) 9481 8402  f: (03) 9481 8402

They don’t have a website.

thanks to:

http://meliors.blogspot.com/

for the photo.

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South Melbourne Market Fashion Night Market – Thursdays In May

April 15, 2009

Style After Dark is South Melbourne Market’s interpretation of a night market. Located along the street in the heritage magnificence of the Market’s wide verandahs, Style After Dark will provide an outlet for a vibrant local community of clothing designers and makers. Stalls will emphasise locally-designed, locally-made and collectible clothing and associated accessories, jewellery and headwear. The location is superb and well-supported by existing food and drink outlets in Cecil Street or the Market’s Food Hall. Live music and performance art. Style After Dark is a street market with a difference, Australian made, high end designers of all crafts. Quality vintage pieces and collectables.

Every Thursday in May – 5.30pm to 9.30pm.

The South Melbourne Market is located on the corner of York, Cecil & Coventry Streets South Melbourne. The South Melbourne Market is easy to get to by car, motorbike, bike, walking or public transport.

Address: 322-326 Coventry Street, South Melbourne 3205
Melway:   Map 1C Ref E11

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News just in! Worn Wild Alternative Market this weekend!

March 11, 2009

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Sticky! Melbourne’s Zines haven

January 10, 2008

There’s nowhere in Melbourne like Sticky!  You’ll find this den of Zine-soaked creativity hidden in the Flinders Street Underpass known as the Campbell Arcade (along with a number of other alt.cult.artisan.shopping essential stops – to be detailed another time), which you access either by getting off the train and using the centre stairs or from Flinders Street near Degraves Lane OR from Degraves Lane where the Baguette and Waffle stand is.

It’s a tiny shop next to the-barber-time-forgot (he insists that the magazines in his window are new… come on, now, really), crammed with badges, zines, some cds and odd paraphernalia, all small-run and many local.  Sticky is a fantastic supporter of local visual expression and run on a very humble budget with lots of volunteer assistance – here’s their manifesto, straight from their website.  Do take a look, as they’re running their FESTIVAL OF THE PHOTOCOPIER in February 08- a most intriguing paen to the art work of the humble office machine.

ABOUT STICKY INSTITUTE

Sticky Institute is an Incorporated Association and is a volunteer run, not for profit Artist Run Initiative housed in Degraves Street Subway under Flinders Street, Melbourne. Sticky was originally conceived as a not for profit retail ‘side project’ in 2001 within Platform Artist Group who operate artist exhibition spaces in the subway and nearby lanes.

The three day a week shop-front idea, ‘Sticky’ began with ten artist publications for sale in the Platform office in April 2001. Since then, Sticky has stocked thousands of titles from around Australia and overseas, and has established itself as a nationally and internationally recognised specialty zine and artist book shop.

In 2007 Sticky became an Artist Run Intitiative in its own right, as Sticky Institute Inc. Sticky continues to share Platform’s office space, its shop front, but is separately administered by Coordinators Luke Sinclair (Sticky’s founder and former Platform Coordinator) and Eloise Peace. The shop is manned by Luke, Eloise and its dedicated team of volunteers.

The principal purposes for which the Association is established are:

To strengthen, serve, represent and appropriately promote innovative creative expression that explores and challenges popular perceptions through Melbourne’s zine culture which encompasses visual arts, crafts, literature and design;

To encourage and facilitate self-identity, self-expression and creation of communities through the provision of space and personalised access to practical and artistic resources as part of a broader independent ‘Do It Yourself’ ethic which celebrates self-empowerment and cultural diversity;

To operate a dynamic, accessible not for profit retail outlet with public exposure in a retail environment with a simple submission process that enables anyone to stock their work and become involved in Melbourne’s zine culture, and ensuring that we charge a minimal sales commission (20%) in the retail operation, the emphasis being on returning as much of the retail price as possible back to those involved in the product’s creation.

Sticky values the vital role and contribution of volunteers to the organisation both past and present.

 **************************************

Sticky encourage you to get involved, so get onto their website or pay them a visit and make/talk/buy/read/think!!!

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Lucrezia and De Sade – Brunswick Street, Fitzroy

January 8, 2008

  

One of Melbourne’s more hidden boutiques stocking locally artisan made wares is Lucrezia and De Sade.  Now there may be a very good reason why the good L and D people keep it a little more discreet: that is because the wares made, many on premises, are of a particular nature.  That is to say, to put it a little more plainly,  Lucrezia and De Sade is Melbourne’s most artistic and stylish fetish shop.   Named after Lucretia Borgia and the notedly kinky Marquis De Sade, it’s a perfect name for such a stylish yet unashamedly perverse emporium.  

The wonderful things about Lucrezia and De Sade are multiple. Number one is their sense of humour.  Their window displays never fail to amuse or at least intrigue: and their Christmas displays are more essential than the Myer Christmas window any day… they visualise what many of us have wished on Santa when the credit card bills come in! 

Number two is the quality of their merchandise.  Whether you’re there to buy something seriously imposing for your normal fetishy life or whether you just want a dress up for a fancy dress party or some goth-style couture, you could do a lot worse than investing in some of the hand made pieces here.  They do nurse and police outfits (in pvc, mostly), they have cuffs, collars and gauntlets worn as much by goths and death metal bands as fetish types, they have some sexy goth cross over clothes and then there are of course all manner of fetish pieces and props.   The clothing and accessories are well stitched and seems to be made of good quality materials.  I’m not as sure about the serious goods, but from a cursory shelf glance they do seem sturdy and shiny.  I’m sure that’s a plus. They also can modify or make custom items and can work in metal, leather, pvc and more – they’re really quite clever. 

Number three: their website.  I encourage anyone to take a look at their retail store, but if you’d rather shop online and stay shy, they’ve got a full ordering system there for you. How considerate!  

 The best things: beautiful metal gauntlets and leather gloves.  Being loud and proudly a fetish shop with an emphasis on using quality materials and making beautiful objects with care.  Surviving for years with a loyal clientele in a decidedly subcultural market.

  The downside:  I don’t think I’m qualified to comment about some of their goods – but they do look very well made anyway.

 Details:441 Brunswick Street Fitzroy 3065 Victoria Australia
Phone: + 61 3 9416 3826Fax: + 61 3 9416 0947
Email: shop@lucreziadesade.com.au   

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Vegan Wares – Smith Street, Collingwood

January 5, 2008

  

Fancy that – Melbourne has its own shoemaking craftspeople!  Not only that, but shoemaking craftspeople who make 100% animal product free shoes.  And the piece de resistance – these “vegan” shoes are not a hippie’s Glastonbury nightmare but in fact really well made beautiful shoes.Like the shoemakers in childrens fairy tales, the Vegan Wares people make all of their shoes themselves on the site of the shop.  Their website  takes you through a tour of the factory and gives a bit of background about why they continue to make their own shoes – quality control.  Vegan wares promise that their shoes are durable and comfy – as well as stylish – and will see out years of wear.   Styles include Victoriana, 20s shoes, even sneakers, boots for men and women including vegan Dr Martins style boots, hiking shoes and sandals. These shoes really are rather beautiful: I can’t resist putting a couple of photos below.

ErnestEstelle  Melita

They also make shoes to order, which you can arrange by contacting them at their premises or via their website. You can also modify the colours of any of their existing styles and have a pair made just for you! 

The best thing about Vegan wares:  1) the shoes are vegan – duh!   2) they’re beautiful and durable 3) they’re made right here in Melbourne.

The downside: they’re not cheap. The average pair of shoes costs around $200, which places them at the upper end of the shoe market. But they will last rather a long time unless you run over them several times with a tractor…  Details:78 Smith Street Collingwood, 3066, Australia  (Approximately 30 metres north of Langridge Street)Shop opening hours:Mon – Sat: 11am – 5pmSunday: ClosedOther times by appointmentPublic Transport: Tram no. 86 from Bourke Street Melbourne CBD, passes our door.   

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Peril Underground

December 28, 2007

So underground there ain’t no photos of it,  so just keep reading, and hopefully, one day my attempts at covert surveillance will bear the fruit I so obsessively hope for *wringing of slightly damp hands, deranged squint etc etc*.   

Peril Underground – once located on Swanston Street as Peril 305 in the days before Student Headquarters took over upper Swanston (not that there’s anything wrong with that etc) – now lurks subterranean and unique in a basement on Elizabeth Street near Flinders Street.  One enters via a laneway next to the horridly iconic  Golden Arches, where you then enter the basement on the right, descend with care down the rather unfriendly stairs (careful in stacked heels or pumps, people), and then you’ll find yourself in Alternative Paraphernalia Paradise.  Chief of the subcultural seraphim is owner Peter – a fixture of this downstairs lair and an affable and well versed fellow in alternative culture. His fair realm exhibits the following counties:

  The Tattoo and Piercing Parlour.  Often booked out and for good reason – so warning:  a casual impetuous (possibly drunk) visit hoping to be bedecked may not bear fruit. Book ahead if possible.

 Music store: featuring collectibles from teen-faves Tool, NIN, Manson etc to utterly obscure worthies like Shinjuku Thief, Laibach, Imperial marching music… with a lean towards industrial, gothic, “ebm”, metal and dark rock  this store ticks the angst-o-metre up to 11 and for anyone desiring an initial dip into the murky pool of these genres, a trip to Peril could just sort you out with your first few hours of listening!  For those already well familiar with  such sounds there’s unknown pleasures awaiting you, plus the added bonus of an extensive catalogue to order from if you can’t find it on the shelf. In the days of internet purchasing that feature may not hold such a drawcard – except in the case of the rare recordings Peter stocks… 

 The clothing emporium:  with humble beginnings as a small corner of the empire, the clothing behemoth has opened it’s silken maw and taken huge bites of the shop space, now emerging the uncontested winner and dominant area of Peril’s fifedom.  For club girls, victorian gents, cyber freaks and the casual Top Goth shopper alike, there’s gold in them thar frills…Thoughtfully accompanied by piercing jewellery, badges, patches and artwork, not to mention gig tix and -for veteran shoppers the beloved gift voucher – Peril supports local artisanship as well, with artwork, photography and clothing – plus cds of course – from the cloistered Melbourne gothic community on display to buy.  

Dvds: a small collection of cult dvds – music, documentary and film.  

Best thing about Peril: the staff! Peter and his revolving band of bon vivantes will entertain you, help you and  won’t scowl at you even if you are asking for a Tool live dvd.  Friday nights sees a cavalcade of musicians, artists, other shopkeepers and general layabouts descend for a rowdy or possibly quiet catch up… you’re still welcome to browse but you might be able to spot the Gothing ‘leet commingling…  

 The downside: the hours can be quite strict, and if not it’s spontaneously so.  Go during the day, don’t wander up after 6 expecting that because it’s alternative types they’ve got nothing better to do than entertain you in the evenings: they do. Also, they have no web presence to speak of which is nothing short of criminal… word is that they’re gearing up (only ten years too late!)  for cyberspace though, which can only be a Very Good Thing.  

 The oddest thing about Peril: they accept vouchers from other shops! So if you got a bum voucher for a present and don’t know what to do with it: take it down to Peril and try your luck trading it in for perilcash!!!

 Address: 17-19 Elizabeth St.City: MelbourneContact: 03-9614 2040 

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