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Monsters, Ghouls and Melancholy Misfits – a season of films @ ACMI 09 – 18 July 2010

June 3, 2010

Two ACMI posts in a row is almost self indulgent, but anyone who has read through this blog would understand that I couldn’t leave this particular event unmentioned!  A season of underground/lesser known horror, grostesquerie and ghoul films alongside some beloved classic schlock to coincide with ACMI’s Tim Burton exhibition in July.

The week-long spook-fest includes the following films:  more information about session times and bookings here:

Freaks + Frankenweenie

Tod Browning’s cult curio from 1932 screening with Burton’s Frankenstein-inspired live-action short.

The Elephant Man

David Lynch’s moving Victorian-era drama about a hideously deformed yet disarmingly genteel man.

Jason and the Argonauts

The mythological 1963 fantasy classic with special effects by stop-motion wizard, Ray Harryhausen.

Frankenstein + Frankenweenie

Mary Shelley’s gothic novel spawned both James Whale’s Universal classic and Burton’s 1984 short.

Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed

Terence Fisher’s 1969 Hammer horror, most faithfully inspired by Mary Shelley’s gothic story.

Black Sunday

Mario Bava’s moody gothic horror from 1960 made a star of cult ‘Scream Queen’ Barbara Steele.

Baron Blood

Mario Bava’s Austrian-set Grand Guignol gothic melodrama, with Joseph Cotton and Elke Sommer.

Nosferatu: A Symphony of Horror

F.W. Murnau’s iconic 1922 German Expressionist classic.

Dracula

Bela Lugosi stars in Universal’s enduring 1931 adaptation of Bram Stoker’s literary classic.

Forbidden Planet

MGM’s 1950s sci-fi cult classic, shot in Cinemascope and starring Robby the Robot – as himself!

The Raven + Vincent

The Universal Pictures’ classic starring Bela Lugosi screens with Burton’s early stop-motion short.

The Pit and the Pendulum

Roger Corman’s extravagant Edgar Allan Poe adapatation co-stars Vincent Price and Barbara Steele.

The Tomb of Ligeia + Vincent

Roger Corman and Vincent Price re-team for Corman’s brilliant, U.K. set, Edgar Allan Poe adaptation.

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